Insects as Pets

Keeping insects as pets requires some extra research into native versus non-native species, laws about keeping insects in your local area (usually applies to poisonous or invasive species). Also, like exotic animals, insects of some types may not be imported or kept in North America, without permits, licenses or other paperwork.

I would prefer something low maintenance and local. I’m not taking responsibility for an invasive species which might find a way to escape or breed, or anything else we don’t need more bugs doing.

Probably a quiet bug, not prone to escape from a jar with holes in the lid. Nothing poisonous or likely to bite, sting, or otherwise draw blood. Considering the lifespan of most insects, something like a butterfly isn’t a good choice. Although a cockroach could seem a practical choice, it’s not for me.

However, you can get some exotic and colourful creatures. I’d consider a spider. I did keep one in my window pane when I was a kid. Not intentionally, she just ended up there and I let her stay. In spring I discovered she had become a mother over the winter. There were hundreds of tiny spiders in my bedroom for awhile. I had put her and her nest (I’m calling it a nest) in a jar at some point. I waited a few days because it was pretty amazing to watch all those little spiders. But, I didn’t want them to die so I took them to the rooftop of my house and let them all free. They mostly set off on drafts of air rather than walking over the roof. I learned quite a bit about common spiders back then. I’m remembering more as I write this.

Like any pet, there’s a lot to consider with bug ownership—time, money and space being key concerns—and there are trendy pet bugs as much as their are trendy designer dogs. Ramsey’s journey began with books, and a lot of trial and error to figure out what kinds of food and living conditions different bugs required (errors oftentimes resulting in dead insects). Since his first pill bugs and earwigs, Ramsey has raised nine different species of praying mantis and several species of millipedes, spiders, and (really huge) stick insects, to name a few. Four giant silk moths currently flutter around his office space.

Source: How to Choose the Pet Bug That’s Right for You

You could look for an ant farm. Maybe not as popular these days but certainly one way to start having insects as pets.

Others easily available:

  • crickets
  • praying mantis
  • centipedes and milipedes
  • snails
  • grasshoppers
  • ladybugs
  • beetles
  • silk worms

The Pet Rock Society

The Pet Rock Society

For pet rock owners, makers, and seekers (vintage or rustic). From a Canadian pet rock keeper.

About:

This is an informal Canadian Pet Rock Society.

If anyone actually wants to join, let me know.

Meanwhile, I’m just going to post pet rock related things as I find them.  Also, I will write about pet rocks, virtual pets and possibly compare keeping pet rocks in favour of keeping any other type of (animal) pet.

Pet Jellyfish

Fish make quiet pets. Fake fish, or jellyfish, make even better pets. A friend posted this to Facebook today. No one guessed they were fake until she said so. How often does anyone see jellyfish to know better. But, she said they do move. A great fake pet. All you have to do is keep the tank and water clean, but without pet food and poo that won’t be such a big job.

Take a look at Aquaficial for more ideas in fake pets for fish tanks.

How to Live With a Pet Allergy Without Getting Rid of Your Pet

The Huffington Post says you can have a pet even if you’re allergic to them. It’s just a matter of:

  • Cleaning more often.
  • Using pet-free zones.
  • Taking more drugs.

None of these are great options. Likely a list developed by someone who does not have much, or any, allergies. A pet-free zone in your house does not help when you usually share the house and facilities like laundry. Clean more often… pretty much the same issue. Pet hair has little fine, pin hairs which get into everything. As for taking more drugs… NO! Thank you.

Allergies are the sixth leading cause of chronic disease in the U.S. and approximately half of all Americans test positive for at least one of the 10 most common allergens, including cat allergies, according to a profile from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) reports that about 15-30 percent of people with allergies have allergic reactions to cats and dogs. With more than 100 million pets in the United States this leads to high allergy morbidity as people are exposed to animal allergens when visiting friends and family or even in public spaces like schools and offices.

Source: How to Live With a Pet Allergy Without Getting Rid of Your Pet

There is another option which the people at the Huffington Post missed. Maybe they’ve been taking too many allergy pills.

Try a pet which does not cause allergies.

There are even fluffy pet options.

If even the hypoallergenic pets give you allergies consider an unusual pet, less fluffy. Snakes, lizards, turtles and fish are not for everyone so consider a pet which won’t cause allergies and needs very little care, like a pet rock. Just a little dusting or a run through the dishwasher… what other pet can you do that with?

In the end, how do you live with a pet allergy without getting rid of your pet? …

  • Give it to someone else and visit now and then.
  • Buy a second home for your pet to live in.
  • Or the even less popular option, taxidermy.
  • Or, you could just take all those drugs and hope your pet doesn’t out live you.

 

Companion Pets for the Eldery

Probably a good idea. If you look at it from the perspective of the cat, a living cat I mean, this is better. A stuffed cat just needs to go through the washing machine now and then. It has no other needs and can give people all the time they want.

Expensive to buy the companion pet but… consider all the expenses of owning a real animal. The companion pet is far less expensive over time. Consider just the first week of supplies for a new pet. Another great thing is never having to worry about finding pet friendly places when moving or travelling. 

Source: Hasbro – Companion Pets