Are Pets Killed Kindly?

Millions of pets are killed (euthanized) in pet shelters every year. According to the Rachael Ray site 3 to 4 million are killed in shelters every year, in the US.

What I don’t hear people talking about is how they are killed. First, are they frightened? Do they have a sense of impending doom? I think it’s likely. Of course, some of those killed will be for health reasons, they were hit by cars, abandoned and sick, old, etc. Some will be killed just because there are too many other pets in the shelter with a better chance of getting adopted.

Secondly, how much does it cost to euthanize an unwanted pet? Then, who pays for it? Shelters run on donations, mainly. Who pays for all those unwanted pets to be “taken care of”?

Reconsider a living pet. A living Christmas tree is one thing, a living animal has more needs and isn’t just seasonal or young and smelling good forever.

Do Pet Owners Care About Animal Rights?

What’s wrong with pets?  The problem is that, you know, we bring these creatures into existence that are perpetually dependent on us. They’re dependent on us for when they eat, when they drink, when they go out, they’re really not animals, in the sense that they cannot take care of themselves, but they’re certainly, obviously, not human, so they’re just basically subject to our whims. Now, understand something: our pets, my pets, your pets, everybody’s pets, are property, whether it’s in the United States, or Canada, or any place else, they’re property. They have no intrinsic value, they only have the extrinsic or external value that we accord to them. So, I love my dogs, and I choose to value them highly, I choose to value those pieces of property that I own highly. But the law doesn’t require me to do so. The law allows me to value my animal property very low, and so as long as I give my dogs food, water, and shelter, I’m not violating the law. I don’t have to show them affection, I don’t have to have them living in the house, I don’t have to treat them as members of my family. And indeed, if I want, I can drive them to a kill shelter today. and say: “Here: I don’t want my dogs anymore, if you can’t find a home for them, you can kill them.” Or I can take them to a veterinarian who is willing to kill them, or I can basically kill them myself, as long as I do it humanely.

So they are property. And I object to that. I don’t think we can justify treating non-humans, whether for food, or for clothing, or as pets, I don’t think we can justify treating them as property.  So, I’m just trying to be clear on what you’re suggesting here. I don’t believe you’re arguing that we should be treating cattle and codfish more like dogs and cats, and I’m sure you’re not arguing that we treat dogs and cats more like cattle and codfish, so what are you arguing?  I’m arguing that we ought to get rid of domestication altogether. I’m arguing that, if animals matter morally, we ought to stop bringing  them into existence and using them as resources. That we ought to take care of the animals that exist here now, but we ought to stop bringing domesticated animals into existence, and you know what, it would not only be a good moral thing to do, it would be good for our health, because I think the evidence that animal products are detrimental to health is increasing, and the reality is animal agriculture is an ecological disaster.

Source: Believe in animal rights? Be prepared to go pet-free – Home | The 180 with Jim Brown | CBC Radio

There are more points about not keeping animals domesticated, from the vegan point of view, on the site –  Animal Rights: The Abolitionist Approach

I don’t agree with not eating animals or animal products. But, I do think we have misplaced ourselves on the food chain. Actually, we have pretty much entirely removed ourselves from the food chain and eliminated most of the predatory animals which could have kept us as part of that chain. Our population has exploded due to putting ourselves on the top of the food chain. Our demands on the food sources of the planet have increased due to increased population. This is the real problem with domesticated animals and animal agriculture. We have warped the food chain to suit ourselves. Ironic that the very agriculture we created to make ourselves head of the food chain is now harming us.

Then there is the issue of pet food.

I don’t think pet owners consider the fact that animals have been killed to make pet food. So, how can they be animal lovers knowing other animals were possibly mistreated (often kept restrained in small spaces, etc.) and then killed and butchered in order to make the food they feed their pet? How is all of that okay with them. Most likely it is just something easier to ignore than consider at all. Do vegetarians, animal rights people, and even the vegans, consider what comes out of that can of pet food.

Pets for Adults Only?

Should pets be for (responsible) adults only? I know pets from animal shelters are particular about who takes home a pet. Pet stores are not. People giving away puppies, kittens and other young animals are not always concerned about where they wind up either. If people really are animal lovers how can they risk giving away that animal without some hope it will be taken care of and not end up feral, neglected or dead?

Source: Flickr – Allison Giguere

Pet- Free Zones

Designating “Pet- Free Zones” Which areas at work should be pet-free zones? We recommend making fitness centers, daycares, meeting spaces, food preparation spaces, dining areas, data centers, medical departments, mother’s lounges, and restrooms pet-free. Employees can also use leashes and child gates to keep pets constrained in smaller areas.

Source: Purina » Designating “Pet- Free Zones”

Even the pet food company believes in pet free zones. It is just a respect for other people. Pet owners who want to bring their animals everywhere are unfair to their animals and the other people around them. Do you really think the animals can’t tell when people are upset or angry? Why bring the pet you claim to love into a situation where they are going to feel that way? Even if you can’t respect other people – how about thinking of your pet instead of yourself?

Myself, I do not think any workplace is a place for pets. As I have written before, I have allergies to animals which causes me to have asthma attacks. For those who don’t know what asthma is – an attack is like drowning in the open air. So I would rather not have pets in any public, indoor area. Workplace, shopping centres, doctor’s offices and all other places people should be able to go and not need to have health issues due to someone bringing their pet.

The only place I can understand bringing a pet to is a veterinarian office or pet food store. A place which does not cater to pets should be a people place and pet free.  This is not against animals or pet owners – it’s just common sense.

For all those who want to bring their pets everywhere… why? Are they your security blanket? Do you really think the animal can’t do without you for any amount of time? I wonder how many pet owners are smothering their pets instead of giving them some space?

Even Purina believes in pet free zones where people don’t cart around pets or hide or smuggle them in. Seriously, why do some people seem so unable to leave their pet some freedom?

Pets with Stockholm Syndrome?

The more you think about it the more you do wonder… Is this the real reason the family dog snaps and fights back – surprising everyone? This is one thing that has always bothered me about keeping animals as pets. There should be a standard about how pets are kept and treated while being kept. Beyond violent abuse there is the “too much of a good thing” abuse which leaves pets obese, babied and never allowed outdoors. Don’t assume pets love being treated like your personal zoo baby.

Source: 25 Things That Keep Getting Weirder The More You Think About Them